Asian Fusion Weddings » East marries West for Double Happiness

We hope you enjoyed the Behind the Scenes video by Summerfield Films in our last blog post.

Today, we’re going to begin to tell how Wendy’s vision for this Canadiana wedding style shoot story all began.  Thank you Rhythm Photography for these gorgeous images.

Since Canadian history included a lot of logging and other forestry related products – we showcased the talented crew at www.FerrisWheelPress.com.  All their products are designed and handcrafted in Toronto, Canada.  For our shoot, Ferris Wheel Press designed the wedding invitation, menu cards, table number as well as a canoe with some wonderful Canadian sediments.

 

pinthis

 

The subtle background pattern added visual texture to the stationery suite.  The various shades of red really emphasized the red of our Canadian flag.  The interplay between the red and black was inspired by the lumber jack plaid.

 

pinthis

 

We absolutely love the laser cut out black maple leave collage in the background – an iconic symbol to all Canadians symbolism our #CanadianPride.

 

pinthis

 

We just adore how the little silver fish even had a slit in the mouth to keep the table number upright.

 

pinthis

 

Wendy was thrilled to be able to use the plaid plates; which fit into the overall mood of the table top design from her personal collection.  The clear plates from Event Rental Group actually featured a leaf pattern with all the intricate veins that a real leaf would exhibit.  The wood cut charger plates and other table top rentals were also from Event Rental Group.

 

pinthis

 

Although we couldn’t show case a live moose, a pewter key chain wedding favour displaying a Canada Moose was the next best thing as a nod to Canada’s wildlife.

 

pinthis

 

#WeTheNorth  #eh  #Canada   #ProudToBeCanadian   #Canada150   #WeMovement   #WeAreCanada   #CanadianHeritage   #StrongerTogether #TrueNorthStrongAndFree

 



Wendy is a Toronto WEDDING PLANNER whose specialty is “East marries West” weddings in the Rocky Mountains, Greater Toronto Area, New York area, Vancouver area, Los Angeles area, Southern California and in the beautiful destination of Bali, Indonesia.

Whether you need wedding planning assistance, a fully designed event or wedding day coordination, Wendy can help you design your most memorable wedding day. CONTACT HER today, she’d love to hear from you.



 

Share to:fL:Hm

We, Canadians are celebrating the 150th anniversary of Confederation and February 15 is National Flag of Canada Day.  This is not only a powerfully symbol, it is a tremendously meaningful one in our Canadian identity.  Canadian history may not be as long as other nations, but it is still certainly rich with much to celebrate.

 

pinthis

 

So, with that in mind, Wendy was inspired by our National Milestone and created a wedding design concept to showcase our Canadian heritage.  Many of the wedding decor items represents the array of natural resources that Canada has to offer.

You’ll find that the team created a wedding story that showcases a bit of a rustic vibe; which speaks to the history of our lumber industry.  Therefore, the natural colour palette chosen reflects that of the lumber jack red and black plaid.  You’ll also find silver tone elements that represent Canada’s mining industries.

Thank you to Anita Cheung of Rhythm Photography and John Summerfields of Summerfields Films for the fabulous showcase of images and all the behind the scenes footage.

Here’s a sneak peak of the Behind the Scenes…..Catch up with Us on Monday as we start to share more Canadian Pride.

 

#WeTheNorth  #eh  #Canada   #ProudToBeCanadian   #Canada150   #WeMovement   #WeAreCanada   #CanadianHeritage   #StrongerTogether #TrueNorthStrongAndFree

 



Wendy is a Toronto WEDDING PLANNER whose specialty is “East marries West” weddings in the Rocky Mountains, Greater Toronto Area, New York area, Vancouver area, Los Angeles area, Southern California and in the beautiful destination of Bali, Indonesia.

Whether you need wedding planning assistance or wedding day coordination, Wendy can help you design your most memorable wedding day. CONTACT HER today, she’d love to hear from you.



 

Share to:fL:Hm

We’re so thrilled to have Kirsten and Mark’s story featured in the Global News today.  Here’s the story…. 

 

These couples had $15,000, $35,000 and $85,000 weddings. What their big days looked like:

How much did you spend on your wedding day?

How much did you spend on your wedding day?

There’s the dress, flowers, cake and venue. Your wedding day is a major life milestone, but how much should you spend on it?

Once you’re engaged, you may be in full-swing wedding planning mode. Your best bet is to start with an honest conversation with your partner about how you both envision your big day. You also have to consider how much money you’re working with.

“When my clients come in, the first thing I tell them is before we do anything we have to understand what your budget is and what your priorities are. That dictates what venues to look at, what your flowers could look like, what designers you want for your dress,” Toronto-based wedding planner, Lynzie Kent, told Global News.

“Finances can be a sensitive subject, especially if there are other contributing parties other than the bride and groom themselves,” according to Wendy Lee, who is a Toronto-based wedding planner.

Kent said your budgeting works in tandem with finding a venue and setting a wedding date. It’s hard to lock in a photographer, florist and other services without a location and date.

Global News talked to three couples with different budgets for their big days.

pinthis

James and Amanda Partridge

James is an economist and Amanda is a midwife.

Wedding date: September 17, 2016

Budget: $15,000

Venue: Guelph Youth Music Centre

No. of guests: 100

(Photos courtesy Amanda Partridge/Jennifer See Studios)

How did you come up with the amount for your budget?

After discussing with our wedding planner, we felt this number would achieve all of our wedding goals. After much consideration, we decided to get married in Guelph, Amanda’s hometown, at the Guelph Youth Music Centre. Toronto was our first choice, but too expensive. The GYMC allowed us to select all our own vendors, and bring in our own alcohol, which saved us a lot of money.

What was your biggest expense?

Food was our largest expense. We were able to save money by opting for cocktails over a plated dinner, though. We had food vendors that had hors d’oeuvres service. There was a variety of food options served after the ceremony until the music started, like salmon lollipops, samosas, mini chicken pot pies, Philly cheese-steak sliders — there were at least 10 different options.

What did you try to save on?

We saved on the décor — almost all of the decorations were DIY or thrift shop finds. We purchased flowers that were in season, inexpensive and easy to acquire. We made our own wine and guests RSVP’d online through our wedding website, which we saved on postage.

We hired vendors that are new or up-and-coming so they weren’t overly expensive but were working hard to earn their stripes.

James’ aunt is from England with a summer house in France. She supplied a popular sparkling wine for us as the first toast before cocktail hour. That saved us a lot of money.

The venue only allowed beer and wine so we didn’t have hard alcohol. We had our family buy Groupons for The Wine Butler and we made bottles of our own wine for really cheap.

What was your biggest splurge?

We hired a second band! This wasn’t planned, or budgeted for, but we had to have them.

What was your must-have for your big day?

We wanted our guests to have the best wedding experience ever. So hiring a second band was a no-brainer.

We hired our first band and a few months later we saw another band, they do covers of old school hip hop and R&B — that’s the type of music we really like. When we saw them we knew this was the band we needed. The venue we selected had an auditorium with a stage so we were able to set up both bands on the stage, with a background of all their gear. It was basically music from 9:30 to 1 a.m.

What is your advice to other couples when it comes to planning and budgeting for the big day?

The day moves by so, so quickly, sometimes it’s really hard to enjoy every moment. Carve out a short period of time for just you and your partner so you can reflect on what’s happening and have time together without being in a large group of people.

Be prepared for rain. The day before it looked like it was going to rain so we got umbrellas, looked at indoor options for our photos and made sure we had a backup plan.

pinthis

Mark and Dian Vernest

Mark is a senior investment analyst at a boutique firm and Dian is an investment and wealth advisor at RBC Dominion Securities.

Wedding date: October 11, 2014.

Budget: $35,000 (excluding a $10,000 honeymoon)

Venue: Berkeley Fieldhouse

(Photos courtesy the Vernests/Sara Wilde photography)

No. of guests: 150. The venue gave us the discipline we needed. It can’t accommodate more than 150 people. We looked at six venues in one day and we made our decision that afternoon. We didn’t want a church or hall or something stuffy.

How did you come up with the amount for your budget?

We had an interview process with our wedding planner and we asked her what the typical downtown Toronto wedding costs. We had no benchmark, we had no idea how much flowers or a band was going to cost.

How did you save up?

We’re both in finance and we’ve always been good with our money. Neither of us had help from our parents – we only wanted to have our friends and didn’t want to be obligated to [invite parents’ friends] so we didn’t want that financial help. We were saving for a while. It wasn’t like we had $50,000 sitting there waiting, but we got to pay installments here, a deposit there. We didn’t have to make any cutbacks.

What was your biggest expense?

Food and booze. We had a good caterer and didn’t skimp on the food. We wanted people to have a good meal — it was beef short ribs and nothing too complicated. We didn’t even give people an option unless they had allergies or were vegetarian.

What did you try to save on?

We didn’t go all out on flowers, we did the bare minimum. We had a nice bouquet for Dian and the bridesmaids, boutonnieres, a few centrepieces here and there but that was it. We saved on using preferred partners from our wedding planner – we used all her vendors and didn’t have to waste time checking out people to know if they’re good and if they’ll show up, etc. By doing that, we saved 25 per cent because she’s a repeat client. [Our wedding planner] paid for herself ten-fold.

We hired Ryerson University film studies students to be our videographers. They put together an incredible video for us for one quarter of the price and it’s incredible.

What was your biggest splurge?

Of importance to us was that everyone had a good time, we just wanted to have a party so we splurged on premium booze, good wine, an awesome band and a DJ that had everyone dancing until the lights were on. We wanted a surprise dance, so our wedding planner got us in touch with a choreographer.

What was your must-have for your big day?

The entertainment. We really wanted to have a band, our surprise dance and we wanted our ceremony to be easy and breezy. We hired an officiant who was more casual and we worked with her on the script, which included how we met. We wanted the flow to be really smooth, we didn’t want people waiting around. We did pictures during the day so people didn’t have to show up to the wedding until 5 p.m. We joined them during the cocktail hour and it went right into the dinner reception and then to the party.

What is your advice to other couples when it comes to planning and budgeting for the big day?

Do pictures ahead of the ceremony if possible. It makes everything less stressful so you can focus on guests right away. We had a cute first look earlier in the day, that was our reveal to each other. We weren’t as emotional during the ceremony getting that part out of the way in a private moment.

We thought engagement photos were lame and our photographer said we didn’t have to use them but let’s do them anyway because it’s practice. We got used to knowing how to look into the camera and built a relationship with the photographer. It’s frustrating how many photos you have to take so this makes it less of a surprise.

Right after your ceremony, eat. We ran back to the bridal suite and we had little appetizers already up there waiting for us. When you’re talking and mingling, you don’t want to eat and at dinner you don’t really eat.

pinthis

Mark and Kirsten Hannay

Mark works in corporate strategy in the mining industry and Kirsten is a nurse.

Wedding date: May 27, 2017.

Budget: $85,000

Venue: King Edward Hotel. Kirsten loves history and a lot of the different vacations we’ve been on have been cultural so the building had a look like some that we’d seen in Europe. We thought it was very elegant and had a lot of little details.

No. of guests: 150

(Photos courtesy Hannays/Rhythm Photography)

How did you come up with the amount for your budget?

Our original budget was around $65,000, but we talked to our Asian Fusion Weddings – wedding planner and with our parents — it was a collection of understanding what our vision was for the wedding combined with talking to our parents who were gracious enough to help us with the funds.

How did you save up?

Our parents obviously helped but we’ve saved over the past few years and we had funds available that weren’t wedding-specific, just general savings. We were probably more frugal than we’d been before. Our wedding planner helped us stretch our budget and delivered us some savings — we cut $10,000 off the wedding price when we moved our date to May from October 2017, which was a major thing.

What was your biggest expense?

Food and drinks for the dinner reception. We had a six-course meal, an open bar and a sweets table after dessert with a collection of cookies, tarts, cheesecakes, panna cotta, and popcorn.

Traditionally in a Chinese wedding, there’s an eight to 10-course meal and each course has different symbolism. The hotel provided us four courses and we brought in an outside Chinese caterer for two more courses so we had Chinese and Western courses. For the Chinese lobster course, we served a lobster bisque, and for fish, we had salmon. For fowl, we had a Cornish hen.

What did you try to save on?

There were certain areas we were more willing to take more of a cut on: we got a lower priced DJ, we didn’t want to go overkill on flowers because we knew they’d look great no matter what and we skipped on a limo. We wanted some sort of Rolls Royce or an old school car and they would have been nice for photos between the church and hotel, but we went with a more budget-friendly SUV.

What was your biggest splurge?

We splurged on photography. We wanted to make sure our day was captured very well and Kirsten and I had a specific look in mind and we found that in our photographer. The price was higher but we were comfortable with that.

What was your must-have for your big day?

We wanted to make sure we had the mixed cultures. [Mark’s] is Western and Kirsten is from Hong Kong so we wanted to merge them together. We had a Chinese tea ceremony in the morning with elder relatives from both sides of the family (Kirsten wore a traditional Chinese cheong sam), and we weaved the traditions into our meals.

What is your advice to other couples when it comes to planning and budgeting for the big day?

When you’re creating your schedule for the wedding day, give some buffer time for things. You’re not doing yourself any favours with aggressive scheduling because things will go off course. Be generous with time or you might run late.

(Graphics created by Janet Cordahi/Global News)

carmen.chai@globalnews.ca

© 2017 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Here’s the original website link to Global News – http://globalnews.ca/news/3495936/these-couples-had-15000-35000-and-85000-weddings-what-their-big-days-looked-like/



Wendy is a Toronto WEDDING PLANNER whose specialty is “East marries West” weddings in the Rocky Mountains, Greater Toronto Area, New York area, Vancouver area, Los Angeles area, Southern California, San Francisco area and in the beautiful destination of Bali, Indonesia.

Whether you need wedding planning assistance or wedding day coordination, Wendy can help you design your most memorable wedding day. CONTACT HER today, she’d love to hear from you.



 

Share to:fL:Hm

Wedding season is right around the corner and many brides have already started to pick out their bridesmaids for their bridal party.  If you have ever been in a bridal party before – you know what the true financial impact it can have on your very own pocket book.  For those of you who are new to this arena, we thought we would highlight a few things so you can be ready when your invitation to be bridesmaids occurs.

Image from www.Etsy.com

pinthis

 

The most common components of being a bridesmaid that one would typically think about would be the attire.  These would include the aesthetic components of being a bridesmaid.  This includes a few core elements:

  1. Bridesmaid’s dress, suit and/or attire –  The basic reality is, that most dresses that the bride chooses for her bridal party – bridesmaids will never be able to wear again.
  2. Shoes  – Hopefully the bride won’t pick mustard yellow, or some other colour you will never be able to wear again.
  3. Accessories – the bride will let you know if she wants necklace, bracelet and/or earrings.
  4. Hair stylist – no more fly away, unruly styles.  You will get all dolled up by the professional.
  5. Make-up artist – no need to worry about the jitters with make-up application because the professional is going to make you picture perfect.
  6. Perfectly polished nails; both hands and feet (especially if you are wearing sandals without hose).

Bridal Party from Asian Fusion Weddings – Image courtesy of www.Ikonica.ca 

pinthis

 

There are some other key factors that both bride and bridesmaids ought to consider:

  • Bachelorette party and/or bridal showers – Some brides end up having multiple parties and showers.  Therefore, it is best to be clear if there are financial contributions required for each event on behalf of each bridesmaid.
  • Destination Wedding – who is going to cover the cost of flight, accommodations and food for the bridesmaid that needs to travel to get to the wedding.
  • Gifts – is the bride going to expect a bridal shower gift and a wedding gift

Bridal Party from Asian Fusion Weddings – Image courtesy of www.StephenSager.com

pinthis

 

There is also one very important element that neither bridesmaid nor bride really considers and that is – time.  As a bridesmaid, if you have a very busy work schedule, or you are reliant on working as many hours as possible to maintain your position in a company – then you will need to carefully ponder over what amount of time commitment you will need to help a bride throughout the planning process.  Here are a few things that will require time:

  1. Dress and shoes – you’ll likely have to go for various appointments to try on dresses and shoes with the other bridesmaids.  Then once they are ordered, you’ll have fitting appointments to attend.
  2. Planning events – as a bridesmaid, you will likely need to help organize and plan events such as shower(s) and bachelorette(s).  How much time this equates to will depend on the number of events and the complexity of the events.  If the plan is to do more of a DIY event, then you’ll need to factor in time for shopping, making and assembling items, set-up and take down.
  3. Hands on help – the bride may need help with invitation assembly, tying favor tags, writing out place cards, assembling ceremony programs, etc.  Again, how many hours, will really depend on the complexity or intricacy of the components.

Bridal Party from Asian Fusion Weddings – Image courtesy of  www.EwanPhelan.com

pinthis

 

When you have a mixed cultural wedding, lines of finances can even be blurred further.  For Chinese wedding customs, the bride and groom pay for all the bridal party’s attire, shoes, accessories, hair stylist, make-up artist and nails.  However, the bride and groom do not purchase a gift for the bridal party members.  This would be the exact reverse for Western wedding cultures.  The bridal party would pay for all those items, and then the bride and groom would purchase a gift.  Essentially the dollar figure spent is exactly the same, but the funds are coming out of a different wallet.

 

Bridal Party from Asian Fusion Weddings – Image courtesy of www.RichardEmmanuel.com

pinthis

 

If you are in the predicament where you have been asked to be a bridesmaids, but simply cannot afford to either pay for all the attire and activities – and/or you are not able to contribute the amount of time that is needed to help the bride, then be honest with yourself and the bride.  Being best friends with the bride means that she will understand that you need to pay rent and make student loan payments.  Being best friends of a gracious bride means that she will thank you for being upfront and honest.  It’s best to stay as friends for life, rather than have no friendship at all after the wedding.

Bridal Party from Asian Fusion Weddings – Image courtesy of www.Ikonica.ca

pinthis

 

If you’ve got any bridesmaids concerns or questions, don’t hesitate to give us a ring at 416-918-3891 or drop us a line at services@asianfusionweddings.com.

 



Wendy is a Toronto WEDDING PLANNER whose specialty is “East marries West” weddings in the Greater Toronto Area, New York area, Vancouver area, Los Angeles area, Southern California and in the beautiful destination of Bali, Indonesia.

Whether you need wedding planning assistance or wedding day coordination, Wendy can help you design your most memorable wedding day. CONTACT HER today, she’d love to hear from you.



Share to:fL:Hm

Last month I had the privilege of being on OMNI Focus Cantonese to speak about decorating your home for Chinese New Year with Carmen from Devoted to You.  It’s a program that is taped in the Breakfast Television and CityLine studio in downtown Toronto and broadcast in south western Ontario.

I had only ever been on camera once for an interview several years ago for CTV about the shark fin soup ban in Toronto.  Here are some tips to keep in mind when you are on camera.  Many thanks to Pepper and Light for taking photos during the taping.

 

pinthis

 

 

a) Ease of speech and share your expertise – In many ways, this experience was completely different than being on CTV.  For starters, it was all in Chinese.  Gulp!  Yep, Chinese is not my native language since I was born in Canada.  However, my Chinese is conversational enough that my bride’s and groom’s parents are really surprised that I was actually born in Canada.

Needless to say, there was some homework on my part before going on camera.  I needed to know what are the Chinese words for certain things like charger plate.  Funny enough, there isn’t a direct translation for charger plate in Chinese!!  Therefore, I could describe its function – a decorative plate where one places another plate on top.

My take away is to be prepared.  I was given the questions ahead of time by the TV anchor and generally scripted all the answers for Carmen and I.  Essentially, you want to come across as being the polished expert and not have trouble expressing your words due to nerves.  Therefore, rehearsing it before hand will also help you remember what you are planning to say even under pressure.

 

pinthis

 

 

b)  Sharing the spotlight  – Remember, the host of the program is there to help keep the momentum of the interview running smoothly and might even want to run things through with you right before taping; as in our case.  Therefore, there is no need to talk over the host.  He is there to share his spotlight with you.  Be extra polite because you are on someone’s else home turf.  You never know, if they like you – you might even get invited back for more interviews.

If you are part of a team, you will want to ensure that each member gets even coverage if possible.  Therefore, discussing it before hand what areas of focus each member will address would be very helpful.  Sometimes things just can’t be evenly divided 50/50 and that’s ok.  There’s room for everyone to receive recognition.

 

pinthis

 

c) Be camera ready and look the part – since we knew what our topic entailed, we decided to dress the part as well.  It’s important to know how the camera reacts to patterns such as stripes, plaid, check, etc.  Therefore wear attire that is professional in appearance.  Initially we were told that we were going to be sitting on stools.  Therefore short skirts were not something that we were planning to wear.  We didn’t want to feel too self-conscious about ensuring that our legs be crossed in a certain way.  We wanted to feel completely as ease while on camera.

Hair and make-up is a must for the camera.  My gorgeous look was created by Nicole Richard’s team.  I completely had faith that Nicole’s team would transform me.  They are the experts at what they do, so I simply told them that I was going to be on TV and they got to work.  I had complete trust that they would make me camera ready.  It’s no surprise, but even our handsome host had some on!

 

pinthis

 

d) Props and other items for display – since our TV interview was about decorating at home, we set up two place settings with coordinating linens that could be filmed.  We also provide photographs and video for OMNI in case they wanted to splice some extra things into the program.

Since we knew ahead of time how much time we would be given to set up, we brought what would be manageable in that time frame.  We were also informed about parking and loading in/loading out procedures that made it easy for us and for the TV crew.

When the table was completely set up, the camera crew then tested our microphones and looked through the cameras.  They told us where to stand, and then immediately told me how far I could move left and right because of the height of our menu card and the size of the floral arrangement.  So if you watched the interview on TV, you’ll now understand what I didn’t move much at all.

 

pinthis

 

pinthis

 

e) Last but not the least, take a deep breath and enjoy the ride – this segment is only about 10 minutes long.  Time really ticks away quickly.  It actually took longer to set up than the interview itself.

 My best advice is to just be yourself and act natural.  Don’t chew gum on camera.  Don’t get distracted by the lights and camera.  Just simply focus on what the host is asking and give your answers accordingly.

 

pinthis

 

Since the interviewed aired, both my Chinese speaking friends and non-Asian friends have watched the segment.  I’ve watched the interview a couple of times just so that I can think about ways of improving things the next time around.  It was also pretty neat to surprise my dad in particular; since he watches OMNI Focus religiously.  It was definitely fun and loved every minute of it!!

 

pinthis

 



Wendy is a Toronto WEDDING PLANNER whose specialty is “East marries West” weddings in the Greater Toronto Area, New York area, Vancouver area, Los Angeles area, Southern California and in the beautiful destination of Bali, Indonesia.

Whether you need wedding planning assistance or wedding day coordination, Wendy can help you design your most memorable wedding day. CONTACT HER today, she’d love to hear from you.



 

Share to:fL:Hm