Asian Fusion Weddings » East marries West for Double Happiness

Chinese New Year 2017 – It’s the Year of the Rooster.

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Chinese New Year is just around the corner and this year is the Year of the Rooster, which is tenth out of 12 Chinese zodiac signs.  In Chinese culture, the Rooster represents fidelity and punctuality, for it wakes people up on time.

This year is already showing some pretty amazing things for us at Asian Fusion Weddings.  We start off the year with a bang!!  We were asked to be featured in the Toronto Star; Canada’s highest circulation newspaper.  They asked our team to showcase table top designs for Chinese New Year.  We were delighted to obliged.  The end result was not just one, but two stunning designs complete with sweets table displays.

The first was dressed up in the traditional Chinese colour palette of red and gold.  These rich and vibrant colours within the Chinese culture represent luck, fortune and prosperity.  The second table was decked out in a more modern Chinoiserie colour palette of blues, pinks and magentas.  Therefore if you don’t prefer the traditional colour scheme, there is another option in terms of decor.  Here are two photographs that depict our inspiration:

Image courtesy of www.pinterest.com

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Image courtesy of www.contemporaryfurniturerentals.com

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Now before we provide you with a sneak peak of the images from this fabulous editorial shoot, we wanted to also provide 3 dining etiquette advice tips in case you are invited to Chinese home or restaurant for dinner.  Chinese New Year is always marked with multiple feasts hosted by many family and friends.  The celebrations last 2 weeks long and end on the 15th day where there is the Spring Festival.  The occasion is usually marked with a Lantern Festival.

Top 3 Dining Tips

1) Ordering food – Should you be at a restaurant and the option of ordering a dish is extended to you, try and order a dish that is different than all the rest.  Therefore having an assortment of dishes for all the guests to enjoy. To ensure that there is enough food for everyone, the general rule of thumb is to order the number of dishes equivalent to guest count plus one.  The final count of dishes should not be seven, as this number of dishes is reserved for funeral banquet dining.  Try and stay with an even number of dishes as an odd number bad for fortune.  For the authentic Chinese wedding banquet, it’s usually a traditional 10 course meal that closes off with sweet red bean soup and Chinese petite four pastries.

 

Image courtesy of https://ireward.superghs.com/

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2) Master the art of eating – as in Western culture, you should close your mouth to chew food well before you swallow it.  Try to minimize any noise when chewing food.  Avoid putting too much food into your mouth at a time as it provides the impression that you are impoverished.  Also avoid stretching your neck, open your mouth wide and extend your tongue to catch food you are lifting to your mouth – it’s really bad table manners. 

Should there be parts of the food that are inedible such as bones and such, use chopsticks or a hand to take them out of your mouth.  Then place those items on the side of the plate.  Do not spit them directly onto the plate or on the ground.   If you have sauce or food particles around your mouth, please use a tissue or napkin to wipe it away.  Do refrain from using your tongue and attempting to lick it away.

 

Image courtesy of http://bigthink.com/

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3) Tea time tea is usually served as soon as you have a seat in a restaurant or at a host/hostess’ home. At a restaurant, the waiter/waitress serves you tea while you read the menu and decide what to order. The tea pot is then left on the table after everyone cups are filled. Guests then serve themselves.

When someone pours tea into your cup, you can tap the table with your pointer and middle finger – two or three times, showing thanks to the pourer for the service and of being enough tea. The pourer will stop pouring when this gesture is seen.  Take care not to overfill the cup with tea or fill it to the brim.  The cup should be about 80% full.

If the teapot is empty, simply leave the lid slightly ajar on the pot.  However, do not place the lid on the table as this is bad form.  The wait staff will understand that this is the signal to refill the teapot.

Image courtesy of www.daveabreuphotography.com

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Wendy is a Toronto WEDDING PLANNER whose specialty is “East marries West” weddings in the Greater Toronto Area, New York area, Vancouver area, Los Angeles area, Southern California and in the beautiful destination of Bali, Indonesia.

Whether you need wedding planning assistance or wedding day coordination, Wendy can help you design your most memorable wedding day. CONTACT HER today, she’d love to hear from you.



 

 

 

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